Healthy Tips: Helpful Tips For Healthy Life


Healthy Hair Tips

Posted in Healthy Hair by doctorsonline on January 18, 2010
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Healthy HairHair is the ultimate accessory; it can add to (or detract from) your overall look instantly. Keeping it in healthy condition is the most important thing you can do to help it look and feel fabulous. And, while it seems easy, this isn’t as simple as minimizing chemical treatments or slathering on a weekly deep conditioner. While these can make your strands softer and less split-end-prone, what really matters is the daily handling; this is what creates the most stress–and potential damage–to your tresses. So whether your concern is dullness, damage, frizz or fragility, we have the answers to ease even the toughest hair-care woes. Read on for tips to achieve run-your-fingers-through-it hair.

1. Steer clear of plastic-bristle brushes. The proper bristles are key; a combination of natural boar bristles on either a round or flat brush are best for dry hair, while soft, rubber-toothed wide-paneled brushes are best for damp hair.

2. Brush before shampooing. A few gentle strokes on dry hair will help remove product buildup and scalp flakes, as well as stimulate the scalp and promote blood flow (which delivers nutrients like oxygen) to hair follicles.

3. Know your water. If your hair looks dull or is hard to style, the problem could be your tap water. Well water contains natural minerals (called “hard water”) that can leave hair lusterless and hard to manage and can impart a brassy, orange hue. Soft water, on the other hand, has fewer damaging minerals. To rid hair of mineral buildup, suds up every week with a clarifying shampoo.

4. Mist your ends with water before home coloring. The ends of your hair are more porous and, as a result, absorb more pigment. Wet hair doesn’t absorb color as readily as dry hair.

5. Trim your troubles. As the ends of your hair get older and damaged by rough handling, they become prone to splitting Get regular trims, at least 1/2 inch every four to eight weeks. Hair grows (on average) half an inch per month, so trim to maintain healthy ends.

6. Use color-protective products. Chemical treatments like color can damage hair because the chemicals have to penetrate the outer layer of the hair (or cuticle) to allow the hue to be absorbed. Color-protective products are specially designed to minimize dryness, keep color true and prevent damage. They typically have more nourishing ingredients, strip less color and are less abusive.

7. Give wet hair extra TLC. It stretches and snaps more easily than dry hair does, so be extra-gentle with it. Use a wide-tooth plastic comb while hair is wet; then, once it’s towel-dried, switch to a good brush. And avoid wooden combs; wood can have microscopic divots that snag hairs.

8. Deep condition once every two weeks. These treatments penetrate the hair shaft and strengthen strands. Using heat (from a blow-dryer) can intensify deep conditioning, as the heat causes the cuticle to open and the ingredients to penetrate.

9. Try an ionic dryer. Ions are atoms with a positive or negative charge. These particular hair-dryers bathe your hair in negative ions, which help break up water molecules faster and cancel out hair-damaging positive ions, Valentin explains. Plus, your hair-drying time is cut in half.

10. Just use your dryer’s nozzle. It’s the best way to help prevent frizz because it concentrates the airflow on sections. Without a nozzle the dryer’s grill gets very hot; if your hair gets too close to it, it will cause damage and/or breakage. For curls, use a diffuser attachment to gently surround your hair with air.

11. Give textured or relaxed hair a break. African-American hair tends to be coarse due to a lack of natural oils (more so if chemically processed). Lavar suggests opting for gentle color choices like semipermanent or vegetable color. Spacing processing treatments at least two weeks apart, with weekly conditioning treatments in between for shine maintenance, helps.

12. Use the right accessories. Expert hair stylists suggests putting hair in soft braids or twists and using claw clips rather than barrettes, which can pull hair.

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